Timpanogos Cave National Monument

The last stop on our trip was to Timpanogos Cave. The cave is partially up the mountain, so everyone has to walk up 1,100 feet of gain to get to the cave entrance!

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Fortunately the views along the way were also pretty great.

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Jeb and I hiked up way too fast compared to the time that the park service allows for people, so we had a lot of time at the top before going in the cave.

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Finally it was time to go in the cave. Cave bacon.

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Timpanogos cave is known for its formation called helictites. It has way more of them than most caves do.

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These are speleothems that grow in crazy directions and seem as if to “defy gravity”.

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The green color was from the nickel and aragonite.

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This formation is known as the “heart of Timpanogos”.

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Jeb with a ton of flowstone behind him in this tall chamber.

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A small “lake” in the cave.

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The next day we headed back for the “intro to caving tour”. This tour was super tame compared to what we did at Jewel Cave and Wind Cave, but we still had fun.

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Tried to take a picture of the lake in Timpanogos that was 16 feet deep. Unfortunately we were pretty far from it, and in this section of the cave where there were no lights it didn’t come out super well.

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Timpanogos Cave was really unique because of the helictites, we were definitely glad we made a stop here on our trip!

One thought on “Timpanogos Cave National Monument

  1. Steve Clemons

    Cool Blog, The cave pictures are amazing. Don’t know how I would do in a cave. You both look really thin. I guess your training hard for Mt. Hood?
    Steve

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